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Dnepr Rear Swing arm


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#1 schierkolk

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Posted 06 October 2010 - 08:24 PM

I was trying to remove the rear swing arm. I pulled the bolts, chrome covers, and unloosened the two bolts that clamp the removable journal. How does this thing come apart ? How does the journal slide out ?

Chris

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#2 Cold War Trophies

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Posted 07 October 2010 - 06:32 AM

View Postschierkolk, on Oct 6 2010, 09:24 PM, said:

I was trying to remove the rear swing arm. I pulled the bolts, chrome covers, and unloosened the two bolts that clamp the removable journal. How does this thing come apart ? How does the journal slide out ?

Chris



The shaft(journal) on the left side of the swing arm will come out, the right ride is part of the swingarm and not removable.  Left and right side of the bike is determined by your seated position, your throttle and brake controls are on the right side!  To remove the shaft, remove the bolts and chrome/metal covers.  Also, remove the rear wheel, final drive, driveshaft, and shocks.  I also remove mufflers just to get them out of the way.  You need to remover the rubber outer bushing halves in the frame to make the arm removal easier.  You can generally just grab the edges of the bushings and pop them loose, but in some cases if they've got some crusties under the rubber you might have to work them a little to get them freed up, but removing the outer bushing shells makes journal and swing arm removal easier.  You can grab the bushings with a pair of pliers, try not to tear the rubber though.  If your model has the drive sidecar wheel, it would be advisable to have an oil pan handy or a pile of newspaper to place your final drive into/onto, it will leak oil after being removed from the bike.  If this is an off and on operation it won't be much leakage.

Removal of the shaft entails REMOVING the 2 pinch bolts on the swingarm, not just loosening them.  After removing, liberally spray in a penetrating lubricant like PB Blaster or whatever your flavor is, into the slot on the swing arm and around the shaft where it comes through the frame and let it work in for a while.  Also, spray the oil onto the right side shaft protruding through the frame, it'll help swingarm removal in later steps.  You will either need a slide hammer or have to make a puller for the shaft removal.  Either way, you will also need a long bolt.  Thread the bolt all the way to the bottom of the shaft hole, attach slide hammer and begin tapping, ramming, and or cursing until it comes out.  It should theoretically come out easily, but if its been in there for 30+ years it might have grown some roots!  If it won't move, you can also try springing the swingarm by driving a metal wedge of some kind into the pinch slot, just make sure that whatever you drive in there is blunt and and won't drive in far enough to hit the shaft, the purpose of driving a wedge into the slot is to spring the metal apart and break any grip, not to cut into the shaft.  With the wedge in place, reapply the penetrating oil and let it sit.  With wedge in place, repeat the removal process.

I have a puller that I made that allows me to quickly pop the shaft with air tools.  It is basically a 1-1/2" deep hi-impact socket, a 4" grade 8 bolt and a hardened 1/4" spacer and a regular steel washer.  Bolt threads into the shaft hole through drive hole in socket and an air impact hammer blasts that shaft right out.  I'd post a foto of it but haven't had any luck uploading fotos to the sight lately.

Swing arm removal is just going to be some grunt work.  If your bike is a solo, 100% for sure, get at least one helper if you are not a physically strong person.  You need to get the bike up on the main stand, and preferably block the front wheel to keep the bike from possibly rolling forward off the stand.  

With shaft removed completely, grab each side of the swingarm.  Push the left boss of the swing arm down to clear the frame(part where shaft goes in), the metal spacer washer between the frame and swingarm will be easy to remove now, if it didn't just fall out.  While holding the left boss down and clear of the frame, raise the rear up and twist down and to the left at the same time.  Swing arm and right frame bushing will just pop out of the frame and there will be no beating the swingarm to get the right side cleared.  Sometimes you'll have to wriggle it around until it comes loose, but keep the downward left twist force on it so it will slide to the left and out of the frame.

Installation is the reverse.  Install the inside frame bushings first before installing swingarm.  After the swing arm is installed, place the metal spacer between the swing arm and left frame bushing with the metal tab facing inwards and to the back of the swingarm.  There is a cut away in the swingarm for the tab.  Sometimes the tab might be broken off or corroded away.  The spacer should move with the swing arm, so if the tab is gone it would be a good idea to replace it.  The swing arm will quickly wear through the spacer if they do not move together, possibly even cause damage to the swingarm and or handling issues.

Before taking a test drive, go over everything and make sure all your bolts are tight, do not assume you got everything, double check all of it.  Check the final drive oil level to make sure its correct, the final drive for sidecar wheel drive will leak after being removed from the bike, check the oil level and refill it if needed even if its a pusher wheel only.  Last, and most important, make sure you hooked up your rear brakes and verify they are actually engaging properly before you drive off, pedal feel should feel the same as before, if not adjust it!

Safe riding!
Clint
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#3 schierkolk

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Posted 08 October 2010 - 10:29 PM

Clint,

Picked up a cheap slide hammer at Harbor Freight. We drilled and tapped a old Jeep Shackle bolt and welded 2 inch 10X1.5 bolt on the end. You have to take out the two clamping bolts because I think one of the holds the pin in. Once we did that it slid right out.

Thank You

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#4 Cold War Trophies

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Posted 08 October 2010 - 11:31 PM

View Postschierkolk, on Oct 8 2010, 11:29 PM, said:

Clint,

Picked up a cheap slide hammer at Harbor Freight. We drilled and tapped a old Jeep Shackle bolt and welded 2 inch 10X1.5 bolt on the end. You have to take out the two clamping bolts because I think one of the holds the pin in. Once we did that it slid right out.

Thank You



Nice puller thingamabob you created.  That is absolutely correct, and stated in the first sentence of the 2nd paragraph.  Actually only the inboard one needs to come out, I just recommend both to make it easier to spring the pinch joint if needed.  I talked to people who've worked endlessly trying to get the left side out without removing the pinch bolt, and or trying in vain to remove the right side shaft which is a permanent part of the swingarm casting.  When you put it back together, the recess on the shaft must be aligned with the inboard pinch bolt hole to get the inboard bolt to go in.

C
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