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Training your hound


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#1 Warthog

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Posted 05 February 2009 - 02:42 PM

We have a dog.  Have done for just over a year now and she's about 18 months old, so right in the teens...

We are lucky: she is very smart. She picks up new commands very quickly, puzzles things out very well, but the flip side is that she quickly learns our tricks.  It also means that she exercises a little too much liberal interpretation when it comes to the commands we give her and whether she's going to obey!! We have been working more on obedience and speed of response (treat if she comes/sits/lies quickly, only verbal praise if she does it slowly etc).  

One challenge that is drive us nuts is that she sometimes gets it into her head to run off and ignore us when we tell her to come.  She also seems to know when she has left it too long to obey and has crossed over into <I've pissed them off> territory, or when we are reaching the time to head home and she wants to play some more.  In fact, she will come when called at the drop of a hat the whole time, but the decede to go AWOL when it looks like we might be heading home (even if we're not).  

There are times when we've been left holding our proverbials (especially in my girlfroiends case) for 15-20 minutes calling like idiots with a dog that couldn't give a rat's arse, running around the park...

At best this is annoying, at worst this is potentially dangerous for her in a city...  Issuing a differnt commmand sometimes works, but not always.

So, what do you do to eliminate this tendency to flick authority the bird?  Its becoming habitual and if it continues, we'll have no choice but to reduce her off-lead time to make sure she doesn't run off..
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#2 Bilge Keel Dave

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Posted 05 February 2009 - 04:22 PM

We have a yellow Labrador retriever who will be two years old in April. I always have a pocket full of treats for him. Every time he comes when called, I give him a treat, even when he's been doing something else bad; he comes, he gets a treat.  He is very consistent now, and comes each time he is called. I have also combined calling his name with whistling for him, he will come now when I just whistle or when I just call his name.

We live in a rural area, and though I always have a leash in my pocket, I rarely use it. We walk a lot along local roads, I have trained him to sit at my feet when a car is approaching. He will stop anything he is doing when he hears the sound of a car, or if he hears me shout, "CAR!" he will run to me and sit. He always gets a treat for cars also.

All successful dog training uses positive reenforcement, mostly in the from of treats, to get the dog to do what you want. Eventually, you only give the treat sometimes, but dogs are always hopeful that they will get the treat and will still do what you want. I'm a softy, so my dog gets the treat more often than not.

I hope this helps.

Dave
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#3 Warthog

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Posted 05 February 2009 - 04:51 PM

View PostBilge Keel Dave, on Feb 5 2009, 11:22 PM, said:

We have a yellow Labrador retriever who will be two years old in April. I always have a pocket full of treats for him. Every time he comes when called, I give him a treat, even when he's been doing something else bad; he comes, he gets a treat.  He is very consistent now, and comes each time he is called. I have also combined calling his name with whistling for him, he will come now when I just whistle or when I just call his name.

We live in a rural area, and though I always have a leash in my pocket, I rarely use it. We walk a lot along local roads, I have trained him to sit at my feet when a car is approaching. He will stop anything he is doing when he hears the sound of a car, or if he hears me shout, "CAR!" he will run to me and sit. He always gets a treat for cars also.

All successful dog training uses positive reenforcement, mostly in the from of treats, to get the dog to do what you want. Eventually, you only give the treat sometimes, but dogs are always hopeful that they will get the treat and will still do what you want. I'm a softy, so my dog gets the treat more often than not.

I hope this helps.

Dave

It's good to see that training yields positive results, but I must say that we have been using treat reward and praise method for sometime.  

That said, if she strings me along, I do get f'cked off and although we have never hit her or anything like that, she can tell that I'm am hacked off with her: i'm less than jovial.  
Thing is she knows when she's crossed the line: she heels religiously the whole way home and generally keeps a low profile even if we have just stood theere and waited patiently for her to come to us, or run the other way to get her to chase.  
She has some inkling that a line has been crossed, so she knows that line exists and chooses to cross it.  The difference in reward and reaction between obeying and running around like a hairy arsed fly for 15 mins are chalk and cheese: its not lost on her!!  The cheeky lil' bugger!!
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#4 cpres

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Posted 11 February 2009 - 02:07 AM

Yep, our furry friends can be a pain in the butt.  My glass breaking lab ignores thunder and fireworks when he is with me in the house, if he is outside he will break glass doors to get in.  The training he has responded to involves food for a treat and lots of love for good behaivor and shunning him for bad behavior.

#5 Bilge Keel Dave

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Posted 11 February 2009 - 02:17 AM

Our old dog was a black Lab. She was afraid of loud noises. On the Forth of July we had to lock her in the house and she would hide under the bed. Our new pup is fearless, loud noises attract him. The vacuum, weed whacker, chain saw, we have to chase him away from them.

They all have different personalities.

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#6 immulmen

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Posted 11 February 2009 - 10:21 AM

View PostBilge Keel Dave, on Feb 11 2009, 02:17 AM, said:

Our old dog was a black Lab. She was afraid of loud noises. On the Forth of July we had to lock her in the house and she would hide under the bed. Our new pup is fearless, loud noises attract him. The vacuum, weed whacker, chain saw, we have to chase him away from them.

They all have different personalities.

Dave

My brother and I work together and he brings his Border Colly every day. Border Colly's want to be told what to do, not treats needed. When  he is looking at you with a ball and you say "Drop the ball and bring me the Frisbee" he will. When you have his toy and you say "go in other room" he goes, then you hide the toy and say OK he will search until he finds it.  One drawback is you can not leave them at home 5 days a week.

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#7 Stammon

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Posted 27 February 2009 - 03:59 PM

To get a dog to come when he doesn't want to put a piece of wrapped sliced sandwich cheese in your pocket. When you are ready to put the leash back on, or go home, or get in the car, whatever he does not want to do, take the cheese out. Wait until the the leash is on, the car is entered, whatever. Then unrap it and give it to him in pieces. Never let him see you put the cheese in your pocket, if he does then he will obey only when it's there.
Rewards work wonderfully, even for a stupid dog. A smart one, well, your best friend always does want you want anyway.

For cats, use a squirt gun. After a while they will stop whatever it is when you go tsk-tsk with your teeth.

I like cats, I just can't eat a whole one by myself.
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#8 Stammon

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Posted 27 February 2009 - 04:01 PM

Oh, and be sure to give your dog cheese as a surprise now and again. It will focus his mind on you wonderfully. I like to put cheese in front of my dog's nose when he is sleeping.
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#9 Sam

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Posted 03 March 2009 - 12:11 PM

our huskie has that same selective deafness. We're going through some rigorous training now (professional help in this case) that involves 20 ft training leads and a prong collar.  Huskies are stubborn. The dog has no choice; she has to come when called. A few months of this, and we'll have her re-wired.

By comparison, the border collie prefers to heel, sit, come, stay, roll over, answer the phone, get the mail, etc; seems go give her something to do, since we're a little short on sheep. Interestingly, she's lactose intolerant (most dogs are, but not to this degree); cheese makes her yarf.

I'd suggest seeking the help of a professional trainer. We put up with that nonesense for quite a while, and it's been a relief to get things under control.

#10 Honda este 1300 Pilot

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Posted 03 March 2009 - 04:27 PM

A long lead (think very, very long) and a good book and/or trainer will likely solve the problems.

Food rewards are also useful, but having long distance control seems to get the point across in a way that sticks after the lead comes off.


View PostSam, on Mar 3 2009, 12:11 PM, said:

our huskie has that same selective deafness. We're going through some rigorous training now (professional help in this case) that involves 20 ft training leads and a prong collar.  Huskies are stubborn. The dog has no choice; she has to come when called. A few months of this, and we'll have her re-wired.

By comparison, the border collie prefers to heel, sit, come, stay, roll over, answer the phone, get the mail, etc; seems go give her something to do, since we're a little short on sheep. Interestingly, she's lactose intolerant (most dogs are, but not to this degree); cheese makes her yarf.

I'd suggest seeking the help of a professional trainer. We put up with that nonesense for quite a while, and it's been a relief to get things under control.


#11 Vishnevsky

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Posted 20 July 2015 - 11:19 PM

I know I am way out of date on this but I'm new and enjoying this site so here goes...

We've got two hounds.  A foxhound and a foxhound/bluetick mix.  These two have strong instincts to track and chase an are often a challenge to reel back in.  It is bred into them and mother nature is difficult to override.  It takes lots of patience and training and it is still no guarantee.  They are very smart but driven strongly by their instincts.  For them, it is an itch you tell them not to scratch...good luck :smile:




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