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Rule, Brittania? Or is it FOOL Brittania?


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#16 GAVNO

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Posted 21 May 2009 - 10:56 AM

It's getting pretty clear that on the subject of tank painting, I'm on my own. Estimates from local body & fender shops ain't pretty.

So far I'm seeing numbers from $400 to $750.

I'll probably wind up sandblasting the tank clean, getting familiar with Bondo, and going with spray can enamel.


Likewise...   plating shops. They don't exist anymore.

The nearest one is about 75 miles away, down in Janesville. Prices are a real liver shriveler too. In most cases, it's cheaper to replace chrome plated parts than it is to replate 'em.


Toward that end...   my header pipes are sound, but the front sides are rusty from rainwater cooking off the plating. I got lucky; a set of NOS headers showed up on EBAY, and the seller was only 5 miles away!   :biggrin:  Buying these beasts was one of the better moves I've made so far.

I hopped aboard The Gremlin and headed over to pick them up. Nick, the seller, turns out to be a really nice guy, and not only British (been here about 15 years), but a Brit Bike nut with a FANTASTIC workshop, and a long line of British motorcycles to choose from as the whim strikes him!

Nick was fascinated by The Gremlin...   talked about how a lot of his buddies back home rode "Cossacks". He went over her with a fine tooth comb, and from his reaction to Ural technology I kinda think that soon we'll have another member of The Foil!  :smile:

What had started out as a 10 minute trip to pick up the pipes became a 2 hour, garage based fat chewing session.  :party: I now have a very helpful Brit Bike mentor to help me get this Triumph going as problems come up!   :party:


In any case...   the pipes.

There's good news and maybe not such good news.

Nick was selling the pipes for someone else, an old bike racer who was getting out of it due to age.

These aren't stock Triumph pipes; they're heavy, very well made, aftermarket DRAG pipes! Essentially, a straight thru, tuned exhaust system (no mufflers or baffles), and guaranteed to be as noisy as Halloween in Hell!  :atombomb:

For street use, baffles and / or mufflers have to be employed, and there it gets sticky.

Stock Triumph pipes are 1.5" diameter. These pipes are 1.625" in diameter, so the stock mufflers won't work. The parts search goes on...


In other areas...  it appears that the best solution to the kludged control cables on throttle and clutch (too short for the nonstock handlebars) is to deal with a couple of generic, overlength cable kits meant for use on custom choppers, and cut 'em to fit.


The carburetor had an oddity...   somewhere along the line, the choke had been removed! Nick tells me this was a commonly done modification, and that a choke isn't really necessary on the 750 Twin. Just the same tho a pair of Bonneville carb tops showed up on EBAY, with the choke slides, cables and fittings still there. They were cheap, so my Amal 900 Series carb is now back in it's original factory configuration.


I've been studying the manuals and Parts Book to try to understand the "oil in frame" lubrication system, and decide what needs to be serviced. We deal with that this weekend. The odd thing...   I've YET to find out how ya go about changing the oil in this beastie! Looks like I'll have to break down and get an overpriced reprint of the Owner's Manual.



Gavno

Owner & Operator of the Mahon Loomis Memorial Short Wave Radio Monitoring Station and Irish Setter Retirement Home.
Lover of complicated radios, simple motorcycles, and friendly old dogs.
ABATE Wisconsin ____________ Patriot Guard Riders
Favorite bumper sticker: I WONDER... WOULD YOU DRIVE ANY BETTER WITH THAT CELLPHONE SHOVED UP YOUR ASS?
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#17 Dubliner15

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Posted 21 May 2009 - 12:24 PM

Keep this thread going Gavno... I'm loving it!

Dub :smile:
ДЧ6

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1990 Dnepr OHV 'Fidelma' - K750 tank, K68 carbs, five coats of black paint, lots of tinkering and some expert advice.
1991 Dnepr OHV 'Brandbilen' - work in progress - RAL 7021 make-up on an underused pig.

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#18 Serious Black

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Posted 22 May 2009 - 03:51 AM

PLEASE don't spoil it with apehanger! I'tt will handle better with homemarket bars. Modern braided brake lines can be bought with a black rubber sleave over. Looks original and helps the brakes. Modern pads are also available to help the brakes. The AMAL carbs are most likely shagged as the alloy they are amde of and the slide alloy tend to be utterly crap. You can buy the main carb body separate wich save buying a complete  set of new carbs. Brass slides are also available in the UK and this gives a better bearing combination with the carb bodies. I suspect modern carb bodies are of better quality.

Instead of the two Lucas coils you can slot in a coil from a Hardley Abelson os a jap 4. Both give a better spark and are more reliable for daily use. The valve guides get a tough lfe on Triumphs but modern material guides and valves cure this. If you have the motor in bits and clean out the sludge trap then DO NOT over tighten the new plug as this can cause the crank to crack. BP7ES plugs work nice but if you use it hard BP8ES are better. The TR7 has a terrible inlet manifold. A radius on the inside of the manifold helps things as does tidying up the port. Most people regard the Tiger as a nice every day bike than the Bonnie.

Morgo do a rotary oil pump. This is expensive but fitted with an oil filter kit and decent air filter can quadruple engine life. WhenI fitted mine I made an oil supply to the rockers from the timing cover. I had a 0.8mm main jet as a restricter here. This flows cool filter oil to the top end instead of hot return oil in the standard set up. Because the Trumpet is hard on it's cams you should probably stick to a motorcycle oil as the latest car oils have reduced Phosphor and Zinc based addatives. My experience is that this can cause problems with cam/ follower wear. I can't remember what cams the TR7 used but a Bonnie inlet cam was pretty hot while the exhaust cam was tame. If you want to hot up the motor the the way to go used to be to put in a hotter exhaust cam to lift power over the whole range.

Good luck what ever you do with it, nice bke.
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#19 Iron Mike

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Posted 22 May 2009 - 08:59 AM

View PostSerious Black, on May 22 2009, 03:51 AM, said:

PLEASE don't spoil it with apehanger! I'tt will handle better with homemarket bars.



Amen .   :ohmy:
Temporarily Dneprless

#20 GAVNO

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Posted 27 May 2009 - 09:23 AM

Reality is starting to set in here as far as parts availability is concerned.

Yesterday after work I took a short detour from my usual route to see a guy that numerous local bikers told me about.

"If ya need parts for your restoration, go to Steve Suter's place! He's got TONS of stuff!"

Suter's Speed Shop, http://www.sutersspeedshop.com , "Home of the World's Fastest Motorcycle On Ice" (according to the teeshirts), is just east of Madison. They claim to have the biggest walk through motorcycle salvage yard in the state of Wisconsin.

I wandered in and was impressed by what I saw...  a whole lot of salvaged, usable parts arranged in racks, plus new parts (mostly tires), motorcycle oil, and a lot of hard to find elsewhere goodies, all at pretty reasonable prices... there's also a pretty decent machine shop, welding, and even a dynamometer here! But as far as the used parts are concerned, there's a fly in the ointment.

I was hoping to be allowed into the yard to look over a wrecked Bonnie or Tiger for small stuff...   battery box mount / retainer, used cable retainer clips, the three front fender stays, maybe even a good, used front master cylinder...  but I was informed immediately that out of the literally thousands of bikes in the yard there isn't a single Triumph of ANY description!

Out of curiosity I inquired further...  nope, no BSAs or Royal Enfields either!

I already KNEW that a Triumph, or any other Brit Bike, is a little bit exotic for this area...  southern Wisconsin seems to be a Suzuki and older Hawg 883 Sportster kind of place, with the more affluent being partial to newer used Fat Boys or 1200 Sporties, and the REALLY well off, more ostentatious Yuppies opting for the odd Road King or Beemer.

But a Brit Bike in the land of bratwursts, cheese head hats and beer farts? That seems to be where the REAL Rebels Without a Cause have carved out a niche...  it hadn't occured to me before, but a British motorcycle in Polka Country is about as rare as a Ural!

Thus, there's not a whole lot of wrecks to inhabit Suter's junkyard. I would imagine that before they get anywhere near a salvage yard in the midwest, most hurt Brit Bikes up here either fall into the hands of restorer / enthusiasts (like me), or they get parted out by vulture like bike owners, picking over the bones of the dead, trying to keep the REST of 'em flying.

Check out EBAY listings of Triumphs for sale... it becomes quickly apparent that the main American following for Trumps is centered in the northeastern US (New York, New Jersey, Massachussets, Vermont, New Hampshire, and by migration from the northeast, a small enclave exists in the Florida panhandle), and among the chopper freeks of Southern California.

Interesting.


In any case...

The latest on the gas tank painting hassle...

A guy at work has a sand blasting cabinet and he's agreed to strip off the old finish for me. Before submitting the tank to that, it makes a trip to a shop where they'll make up custom, color matched spray cans of automotive enamel.

Before putting on a coat of zinc chromate aircraft primer, we attend a class called Bondo 101.


Right now I have a ton of EBAY bids outstanding; someone over in Michigan is apparently parting out an older Bonneville. Maybe I'll get lucky on that...



Gavno / Mr. T.

Owner & Operator of the Mahon Loomis Memorial Short Wave Radio Monitoring Station and Irish Setter Retirement Home.
Lover of complicated radios, simple motorcycles, and friendly old dogs.
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#21 GAVNO

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Posted 28 May 2009 - 10:14 AM

This project is becoming a learning process, in many different ways. For one thing, I'm noting that my original plan is falling apart because it's impractical.

The Original Plan; First priority, concentrate money and effort on getting it running, and making it safe. Second priority, start working on making it pretty, and restoring it to original configuration, hopefully over an extended period of time to keep down the economic impact.

With a bike that's the least bit exotic, like a Brit Bike, and a bike that's 36 years old, those priorities don't work. The reason is parts availability.

On EBAY I found somebody parting out a Bonneville. In one of his bid packages, he had the entire front brake system except for the disk; master cylinder / reservoir / control lever / electrical switch unit, all brake lines, and caliper.

I have a good caliper here, and the lines are essentially useless junk; brake fluid is gonna get contaminated by water if it's in ancient rubber hoses. Those suckers are getting replaced with NEW hoses.

What I needed is the master cylinder. Rebuilding the grip with reconditioned parts isn't a real tasty proposition; from suppliers the cylinder alone is $250, the reservoir is another $27.00, and there's other bits and pieces to be obtained to complete the job.

A high bid of $127.00 got me the whole shootin' match... and I get a spare front brake caliper and it's associated effluvia out of the deal too.

This is the only time in the last month I've seen the brake parts he's offering come up on EBAY...  so I snatched 'em up fast, despite the fact that the package contains more stuff than I really need. My bid and shipping cost is a LOT lower in cost than the cost of buying up replacement parts from any supplier. Besides, the nature of the parts fits my basic philosophical approach; first priority is to get the systems working, and make 'em safe.

There's no question here...  go for that puppy! But then, the priorities start to fall apart...


Checking out his other auctions...  he's also selling nonessential parts that I'm gonna want a year down the road.

There's a kick starter with decent looking chrome...  ditto a shifter lever.

The ones I have are servicable, but they're suffering from large areas of peeling chrome, and rust underneath. Strictly a cosmetic problem, a low priority.

The question is simple. GOOD restoration parts are available NOW, at a reasonable price; will they still be available in six months?

Is it worth it to burn limited cash resources NOW, in hopes of saving a few bucks by not waiting until LATER to buy this stuff? Assuming of course that it's still available AT ALL when you want it later...

Well...   I gotta good kick starter and shifter, strictly on the basis of looks, not necessity...



So far, the trend seems to be that relatively minor, mostly cosmetic parts are showing up much more frequently on EBAY and in other used venues than vital, working iron does. Relative scarcity of this stuff makes it desirable to jump on, say, a fender, as well as a brake caliper.

When working with an old bike (15 - 20 years and older) in a restoration, aesthetics and utility CANNOT be reasonably seperated and prioritized. When a needed part pops it's head up, you grab it while it's within reach.


With more common bikes (i.e., Riceburners and Hawgs), it's easier to wait and crank back the pace of cash leakage. But the more exotic a bike is, the more the pressure is on to DO IT ALL AT ONCE.


One other place where prioities trash Grand Plans...  some things are more time sensitive than others.

Originally, The Plan was to start at the front of the bike and work toward  the rear with your efforts. By that logic, the front brake should have been the first problem tackled, along with the front tire and wheel bearings...  not to mention reaching a decision on if fork seals need to be changed.

In the Real World tho, the bike SMELLED...   it reeked to high heaven from the tankfull of varnish, fumes and water.

To checkmate any further tank damage, and make the garage smell better, it got dealt with FIRST. Once the fuel system had been touched, it was only logical to proceed into the petcocks (they had to be removed from the tank), down the gas lines (toast!!!), and on into the carb and air box, only stopping at the intake manifold.

After this little detour down Gasoline Alley... upon returning to the front wheel, it suddenly seems logical that tire replacement should be one of the LAST restoration steps before roll out.

In this game, it's clear that logic is as flexible and stretchable as Silly Putty!   :feelssogood:


Gavno

Owner & Operator of the Mahon Loomis Memorial Short Wave Radio Monitoring Station and Irish Setter Retirement Home.
Lover of complicated radios, simple motorcycles, and friendly old dogs.
ABATE Wisconsin ____________ Patriot Guard Riders
Favorite bumper sticker: I WONDER... WOULD YOU DRIVE ANY BETTER WITH THAT CELLPHONE SHOVED UP YOUR ASS?
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#22 kraut-60

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Posted 09 June 2009 - 04:04 PM

Hey Gav, you must be busy...no posts regarding trump resto. Hope alls well...let us know "waz-upp"
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#23 GAVNO

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Posted 12 June 2009 - 12:51 AM

Yeah, other priorities have popped up on me.

The pickup (Ford F-150) came up with the need for a high buck repair (about $1400 for rear axle seals and one new caliper / disk). I had a decision to make...

Do I REALLY wanna put that kind of bread into an 11 year old truck, beginning to show rust, and with 125,000 on the clock... or do I wanna consider replacement?

Replacement won out; with the insane rush out there to dump inventory, there's some unreal deals being offered right now!

Moved to a standard cab Ranger; yeah, after 35 years of driving (in order of acquisition) a Chevy C20, a full size Chevy Blazer, a Dodge 4WD Ram Charger, and an F-150, driving a Ranger feels like driving a Tonka Truck!!!   :P    

However...  if and when gas goes back to $4.00+ a gallon, a Ranger doesn't drain a 35 gallon tank every 2 weeks. Those $85.00 fillups were killing me!   :blink:

Right now...  sidetracked from the Triumph a bit. Just swapped out the cheesy stock radio in the Ranger for a decent one with HD Radio and CD capability, and I'm waiting for delivery of Jensen speakers to swap out the crap that Ford uses.

J. C. Whitney is sending a 2 ball box hitch (max towing capacity is only about 1500 LBS, but that'll do for my needs), a tailgate lock (Ford's gettin' CHEAP when they don't make that standard...  but a stolen tailgate ISN'T gettin' any cheaper!  :beerchug: ), and a soft tonneau cover (it's been over a decade since I've priced toppers... EGADS!!!  :beer!: ).

Still debating Bedrug like the F-150 had...  I'll probably go for it.


Anyway...   in Things Triumph...

A buddy at work put my tank thru his Harbor Freight sandblasting cabinet, and in exchange for a case of Budwieser we're now down to naked steel. Planning on dealing in Bondo and sandpaper this weekend.

A stop at an auto body supply house has yielded up a few spray cans of appropriste paints (blue and white), and a couple of cans of clear coat (total = $26.00). We'll see how this goes...  

A stop at the FBO at Truax Field got me a big spray can of zinc chromate aircraft primer. I think we're ready now.

Doing some hoss trading, I got my hands on a brand new Dunlop K-70 for the front (3.25 x 19)... a real, traditional, Old School tire design (circa 1970s) that's still being produced. Now I'm looking for a deal on one for the rear (4.00 x 18).

A pair of new inner tubes was found on EBAY for a reasonable price...  and the Internet has taught me (I HOPE!!!) how to deal with "rim locks", and to balance motorcycle tires at home.  :smile:

Haven't had time to mess with the bike too much...   but circumstances HAVE given me adequate time to learn more and more about the bike from the Internet.



Gavno

Owner & Operator of the Mahon Loomis Memorial Short Wave Radio Monitoring Station and Irish Setter Retirement Home.
Lover of complicated radios, simple motorcycles, and friendly old dogs.
ABATE Wisconsin ____________ Patriot Guard Riders
Favorite bumper sticker: I WONDER... WOULD YOU DRIVE ANY BETTER WITH THAT CELLPHONE SHOVED UP YOUR ASS?
Spiritual Brother to Don Quixote De La Mancha...
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#24 Dubliner15

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Posted 12 June 2009 - 12:57 AM

More pics when you have the time mate!

Dub
ДЧ6

::::::::::::::::::::::::::
1990 Dnepr OHV 'Fidelma' - K750 tank, K68 carbs, five coats of black paint, lots of tinkering and some expert advice.
1991 Dnepr OHV 'Brandbilen' - work in progress - RAL 7021 make-up on an underused pig.

::::::::::::::::::::::::::

Dub's Dnepr

Russian bikes are not a mode of transport - they are a test of character.

It's always DneprTime

#25 IceQueen

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Posted 13 June 2009 - 07:45 AM

You'll like the Ranger, I'm on my second one since '94, been very reliable.  I recommend the spray-on bedliner - pricey but worth it.  Great deal you got on the sandblasting!  :beerchug:  :thumbsup!:
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#26 GAVNO

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Posted 04 July 2009 - 07:54 PM

A day for Education...  An Introduction to the Wonderful World of Bondo!   :wino:

WHO invented this goop???  NOW I know that there was a good reason that I've avoided it for all these decades!

When I was a teenager, in MY circle Bondo was the stuff of car jokes...   something from the world of $50 dollar jalopies that had to be pushed home. When I inevitably wound up with a dent or a ding, I just lived with it. Bondo was the Kiss of Death, and DEFINITELY not cool.

Based on today's experience, I'd say yep, that's about right assessment of this stuff...

This glop is NOT easy to work with. No matter how small a batch you make up for a new layer, it's always WAY too much. Thin layers...   they're curing nicely in about a half hour, and I figure that if I just let it sit around and cure for a few days I should be able to start sanding the growing BLOB that's filling a dent in the tank.

My biggest fear...  as soon as I start sanding, the whole gawddamned lump os gonna pop out of the dent!   :blink:


At long last, I have enough EBAY obtained parts to start exploring the front disk brake and begin to cure it's ills.

After a couple of months of searching, an extra long hydraulic hose to go from the master cylinder to the bracket on the triple trees has finally been obtained...  made by Lockheed (England), it's apparently an OEM Triumph brake line with the appropriate banjo connector on one end.   :cheers:

Along with the salvaged Bonneville hard line section, obtained to replace the improvised mess that the previous owner made of the ORIGINAL brake line, it fits PERFECTLY.

Guess what...   as the old brake line ripped out and the new one got installed and the connectors screwed down tight, I discovered that I'm allergic to brake fluid. My hands are a red, blotchy mess, burning and itching like hell.

A quick trip through Group Health Cooperative gave me a tube of cortizone cream. At the pharmacy, a box of latex gloves was obtained, but I've had enough of that craziness for one day; the master cylinder will get installed later.


Turning to other, non brake fluid contaminated areas...  the tachometer was disconnected for disassembly and internal cleaning.

I discovered that the mechnical drive cable doesn't turn. Investigating further, I have to thank the previous owner for NEVER lubricating the tach cable. The connector at the engine end is not only seized tight, but the spline that goes into the engine drive gear is TWISTED about 45 degrees! That makes me wonder if the drive gearbox is buggered up. Hopefully, it won't be necessary to rip the crankcase apart to find out!  :wacko:

If I'm REAL lucky...  the problem can be cured by just obtaining a replacement tach cable.

Finally turning to the tachometer itself...  once again, Previous Owner, for reasons unknown, decided to run the tach without having an illumination bulb holder installed...   and the case is loaded with dust and debris.

Why did he do that???   Well...  maybe it's because the tach stopped working!    :P

Attached File  Tacky_Tach_2.jpg   855.38K   4 downloads

The tach case is the type that cannot be opened. Damn it. The cover glass bezel is in a press fitted ring. So...  it's time to consider alternatives.

An instrument repair shop to recondition the tach? Maybe.  

A replacement?  I'd hate to do that; this tach is an original Smith's Co. instrument.

Let is go as is; dirt, paint flakes and all?    Probably the path of least resistance.


Fortunately, the matching speedo seems to be in much better shape internally.


I found a really great dealer that specializes in the bits & peices that a Brit Bike needs...  on top of it, he has a bike that's just like the one I'm trying to get running!

http://www.northerne...a/About NEC.htm


The battle goes on...


Gavno

Owner & Operator of the Mahon Loomis Memorial Short Wave Radio Monitoring Station and Irish Setter Retirement Home.
Lover of complicated radios, simple motorcycles, and friendly old dogs.
ABATE Wisconsin ____________ Patriot Guard Riders
Favorite bumper sticker: I WONDER... WOULD YOU DRIVE ANY BETTER WITH THAT CELLPHONE SHOVED UP YOUR ASS?
Spiritual Brother to Don Quixote De La Mancha...
          CONNOISEIER OF ROLLER DERBY, KILTS, AND OTHER ESOTERIC EFFLUVIA

#27 kraut-60

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Posted 04 July 2009 - 09:01 PM

Hey Gav, Sorry to hear of your uphill battle in restoring your Trump...hang in there man, it will get better...eventually. :wino:
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2003 Rott-ador OZZY "Crummy Dog"
1999 Ford CVPI "winter beater" the sergeant

#28 Serious Black

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Posted 05 July 2009 - 09:57 AM

You can get the bezel off with careful use of a thin screw driver to prise round the edges. It's difficult not to damage it but it can be done. It can then be re-crimped when you put the whole thing back together. I probably won't look to pretty but it can be done.
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#29 Iron Mike

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Posted 09 July 2009 - 07:56 AM

View PostSerious Black, on Jul 5 2009, 09:57 AM, said:

You can get the bezel off with careful use of a thin screw driver to prise round the edges. It's difficult not to damage it but it can be done. It can then be re-crimped when you put the whole thing back together. I probably won't look to pretty but it can be done.


A few years back someone started selling repops of these trim bezels. They're most likely still available.
Temporarily Dneprless

#30 IceQueen

IceQueen

    Russian Bike Nut

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Posted 30 July 2009 - 07:07 PM

Gav, we need news! What's new, exciting or aggravating? I'm following your progress faithfully, as it's giving me a preview of what I'll be getting into if I buy my friend's '67 Super Hawk. Please, update!
Melanie
2007 Ural Gear Up Arctic Limited Edition, "Snowbeast"
1998 Honda Shadow ACE Tourer, "Hrududu"
2011 Suzuki V-Strom 650, "Farkle Monster"




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