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2002 Tourist dead


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#1 Mark_MB750M

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Posted 09 October 2014 - 07:01 PM

The night before the FART, my Tourist died.  Well, it actually died a couple of days prior - went to start and all the lights went out.  The old battery was down to 11V or so since the bike had been sitting for 6-7 weeks, so I got a new battery last night and charged it.  Installed it in the bike, still no idiot lights or headlight.  Battery shows 13V, connections are tight, the positve to the starter and ground up to the frame feel tight.

I check the 50 headlight fuse, the 4 fused in the block behind the steering head, and the fuse under the gas tank.  All are good (either continutiy/low resistance or visually OK).  Nothing else obvious is spriging to mind, does anyone have an idea - some other fuse I missed?

Thanks!
Mark
Current:
2002 Ural Tourist
2017 Harley-Davidson FLHTK

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2000 BMW RT1100RT
1975 MB-750M
2002 Kawasaki Vulcan 750
1995 Honda Pan-European (ST1100)
1977 Honda CB750F

#2 Russ Noe

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Posted 09 October 2014 - 10:46 PM

Get that Volt meter out and start testing circuits to find where the power disappears.
First place:
Make sure the battery ground connection is clean and tight at BOTH ends.
~RN

#3 Mark_MB750M

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Posted 10 October 2014 - 04:51 AM

Russ - where's the other end of the ground?  from what I can see, there's a wire from the negative to a poiint under the seat.  There's a second wire from negative down to (I think) a connection on the engine near the right footpeg.  Those connections feel tight, I can go out in a few and check the resistance as well.
Current:
2002 Ural Tourist
2017 Harley-Davidson FLHTK

Previous:
2000 BMW RT1100RT
1975 MB-750M
2002 Kawasaki Vulcan 750
1995 Honda Pan-European (ST1100)
1977 Honda CB750F

#4 Russ Noe

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Posted 10 October 2014 - 12:40 PM

View PostMark_MB750M, on 10 October 2014 - 04:51 AM, said:

Russ - where's the other end of the ground?  from what I can see, there's a wire from the negative to a poiint under the seat.  There's a second wire from negative down to (I think) a connection on the engine near the right footpeg.  Those connections feel tight, I can go out in a few and check the resistance as well.
I recommend you actually loosen, clean and retighten those ground connections.  I have experienced corrosion at the connections that only shows up as measured high resistance, or visible crud upon disassembly and inspection.  I also have installed high-current disconnect switches in those lines (on all three of our Urals), so that I can totally disconnect the battery from the bike, when not in use.
~RN

#5 Vance Blosser

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Posted 10 October 2014 - 07:21 PM

Russ is correct. I've had a bike be dead after coming out of a store due to a corroded ground on the bike frame.

#6 Ken Ulrich

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Posted 10 October 2014 - 09:19 PM

Here in the far north, (wisconsin)  corrosion from road salts will develop a lead oxide that will make very good insulation, at all the wire connections. if you have been to the beach at some time in the past, it can do the same, easy fix with sand paper, wire brushes, scraping, will all make things new ....almost..In spite of your best efforts, there will be a little bit of the salts etc remaining, this will start the process all over again, bummer! There is a pink grease, used for wheel bearings, that is/was  intended for disc brake appications. an ever so small amount of this smeared on the culpirt will exclude the O2 and moisture, that is needed  to restart the corrosion. By virtue of the way bikes are built, leaving everything out in the open air, it is an open invitation for this to be a problem....Ken   :smileywaving:

#7 Jimmyjud

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Posted 10 November 2014 - 01:45 AM

I have a 2002 bc.  The positive post, on the left side, has two wires- one to the headlights, the other to the relay.  the one negative lead goes to ground.
  You have two from the negative side?

#8 JPanyon

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Posted 10 November 2014 - 08:50 PM

My 2002 has a heavy duty cable from the negative battery post (on the right side) that loops around to the left side of the battery area, and is tied to a "ground disconnect" switch hidden behind the detachable cover on the left side of the rig.  The switch itself is grounded by the screws that mount it to the seat base plate.  The plate is welded to the frame.  This is one circuit to look at with an eye for corrosion, and/or loose connections.

I'd also check the hot lead from the battery to the alternator, then on to the ignition switch, then to the fuse block.  Any loose connection in this path will also leave you dead.

#9 lobofuego

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Posted 19 November 2014 - 08:27 PM

But of course whilst stuck at the side of the road.....waiting....you could run that spare bit of wire, you always have in your toolkit, to the ignition module(there are only 3 wires)!!!....and it should spark.....that at least will get you home and away from the various axe murdering phycos, who according every film I watch, these days seem to inhabit every quiet secluded spot in the US.....! :smileywaving:

#10 Mark_MB750M

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Posted 11 December 2014 - 06:25 PM

Thanks to you all for the replies - sorry I'm so late getting back.  Anyway, with the help of Dnepr Tim at the FART, we basically did what Russ suggested and just started tracing the power.  As it turned out, there are 2 cables from the positive - one large gauge and one smaller one.  Well, when I put the new battery it, I wasn't paying attention and connected the small gauge cable to the negative.  That was the culprit.

However, this has inspired me to try and rationalize the fuse blocks on the bike over the winter.  The spot behind the headlight is OK, but the fuses in the bucket and under the tank are a PITA and should defintely be relocated.  Maybe even change to automotive-type blade fuses.
Current:
2002 Ural Tourist
2017 Harley-Davidson FLHTK

Previous:
2000 BMW RT1100RT
1975 MB-750M
2002 Kawasaki Vulcan 750
1995 Honda Pan-European (ST1100)
1977 Honda CB750F




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