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New to all this. Just acquired 1966 Dnepr K750 with sidecar in UK


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Hello. I've just joined this wonderful forum after searching for some technical info on a 1966 K750 I've just bought.

I've been looking at these bike for several years but didn't intend to buy just yet but this came up locally for a good price so was too good to turn down.

It's not registered yet in the UK but I've started this process. It was also sold as a non runner so I've got to fix a few things. It's also unfortunately missing some parts.


I'd be really interested in some feedback on it's original condition. If anything is glaringly wrong

Also, what main rear light should it have, based on the sidecar light? Is it the one I've included in the pictures? Or the same as the one on the sidecar?

I'm also stuggling to work out how to accuratley set up the front drum brake as it seems this can only be done by hand with the adusting rod being taken off, adjusted, then put back on but I'm still not happy that the balance will be ok.

Finally, for now, I found the m72 pdf english manual on here somewhere. Is this mostly applicable to this bike? Great if it is as it answers a lot of questions.


I look forward to contibuting (but probably mainly asking lots of questions : )

Cheers

Dnepr1.jpg

Dnepr2.jpg

Dnepr3.jpg

Dnepr8.jpg

Dnepr9.jpg

s-l1600.jpg

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You have the correct rear tail/stop light for the motorcycle side of things. That lamp has separate bulbs for tail light and the brake light. The lights on the sidecar are correct also. The sidecar has no brake light, only a tail light and the white light on the front near top of the sidecar fender. It has the correct machine gun mount on the front of the sidecar and you have a correct ammo box as well. It's a very nice looking K750! I don't have any experience with the front brake setup on the K750. I have a Dnepr MT-11 so it may be completely different from my bike. It looks similar from the outside. The adjustable bar between the brake levers is for balancing the cams that press the brake shoes out into the drum. Adjustment is done where the brake cable attaches to the front brake hub by screwing the threaded cable stop in or out.

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Hello. Thanks for the replies. I appreciate it.

Regarding the front brake; it's not the cable I'm trying to adjust but the length of the rod between the cams to make sure they are balanced the same. I'm just not sure of the correct procedure. It would be easier if the threads on the bar were opposed so turning lengthened / shortend it, like a track rod, but this isn't the case.

Regarding the sidecar step, do you mean the small cross plate part that you'd actually place your foot on rather than the actual frame? I'm not sure as I've had to store the sidecar elsewhere at the moment while I work on the actual bike. So it's not here to check.

Why would this matter?

 

Thanks again : )

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Regarding the front brake; it's not the cable I'm trying to adjust but the length of the rod between the cams to make sure they are balanced the same. I'm just not sure of the correct procedure. It would be easier if the threads on the bar were opposed so turning lengthened / shortend it, like a track rod, but this isn't the case.

Put the front axle through the axle hole and use it to help measure the distance between each of the brake shoes. I used a peace of flat aluminium bar with a hole in one end that slides over the axle. The other end I slotted for a small screw. I cut a point on the end of the screw to use as a pointer. To use it pull the brake lever in and tie it down with string about where the lever would be when pulling in the brake lever when the front wheel with brake is assembled and working and the pads would be contacting the brake drum. Now set the pointer so it points to the outside of the brake shoe friction pad. Now rotate the pointer to the other shoe and check to make sure it points to the same place on the other brake shoe pad. Adjust the adjustment rod until the pointer points to the same place on both brake pads. You could use a peace of wood, hard plastic, or even wire as long as you can accurately measure the distance between the axle and the brake pads. You could even hold a ruler on the axle and measure the distance between the axle and the brake pads.

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  • 1 month later...
  • 1 month later...

Hi Blix,

you mention that you're going through the process of registering your rig in the UK. The elephant in the room is that you cannot legally use a 'Left- hand drive' i.e 'Continental' outfit on the road in the UK that has been registered within the last forty years. These were outlawed in 1981 when the current 'Construction and Use' legislation came into effect. Any rig registered in the UK before this point IS legal to use on the road here with the sidecar on either side, but no machine registered in the UK after this point is legal with the sidecar on the right.

Note that this refers to the date of FIRST UK REGISTRATION, NOT TO THE DATE OF MANUFACTURE. Unfortunately this cannot be backdated to take account of the actual age of the vehicle. Foreign registration paperwork doesn't count either.

For further information provided by F2 motorcycles (Ural specialists in Cambridgeshire UK) look at the link below as they get asked this a lot.

https://f2mcltd.blogspot.com/2019/08/right-hand-sidecars-in-uk.html

This is why they can't supply 2-wheel drive Russian bikes to the UK. The Ural factory is only now producing a right-hand drive version of their product for the Australian market as the same laws apply there, but substantial re-engineering has been required to achieve this.

The Cossack Owners Club (UK) can help with some aspects of registration, such as helping to certify age so you can get an age-related licence plate, but as far as using it on UK roads you may have to find a left-hand sidecar chassis (the bodies were always the same regardless of side) or run it as a solo.

www.cossackownersclub.co.uk

Sorry to be the bearer of bad news, but the DVLA (registering authority in the UK) cannot help you with this as it's a legal issue.

Incidentally, the front brake on your bike is the later twin-leading-shoe type from the 650cc MT10-36 onward. The sidevalve 750 bikes were originally fitted with the single-leading shoe type with click-stop adjustment for the shoes, but they were less powerful (except in reverse) than the later units.

Good Luck!

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