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Did just that, washed it with soapy water and put it on the motorcycle stand for some tlc.  I finally got around to installing a quality cork oil pan gasket,  it’s been leaking here for a couple of years and although it doesn’t really harm  anything there is a build up of oily road grime I’d like to stop.  This is of course in the delusional interest of owning a Dnepr that doesn’t leak.  I’m still trying...

sorry for rotated photos, not sure how to prevent this. ND.

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I took apart one carb today because the idle mixture screw position made no difference so I suspected the idle jet was blocked even though I cleaned them recently and I’m running fuel filters.  I could see a pinprick of light through the jet but after using the jet cleaning rod I noticed it was in fact partially blocked.  Now the bike started easier than before and I adjusted the carbs to idle properly.   Rode 45km and everything working very well, it settles down to a nice even idle.

Exception...my new gasket didn’t stop the slow oil leak. Do you need to use sealant with cork?05393B0D-A06C-483D-9AC1-AAF116A4F835.jpeg.64bddd8557e30d03b7b1745835a4b82f.jpeg

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Hi Duck.

Been watching this thread for awhile.  Glad you are making real progress.

I always got away with just using a light coat of grease on cork gaskets.  If I use synthetic oil my castings seep.  Some castings seep with any oil.  You can use baby powder to track down a leak if it is hard to pinpoint.  I imagine you already know cork gaskets don't like fastener over tightening.  Other than that look for cracks or light gouges on the flanges.

Good luck with your bike.  It is really looking pretty.

Nick

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  • 2 weeks later...

Appreciated Nick.  I don’t have the heart to pull it off again for such a minor leak, I’ll try some grease when I need to change the oil in the spring.   I also have some minor seepage past the seal on the little rod that actuates the clutch release lever from within the gearbox.  I’ll try a different o ring.  Happy New Year to everyone.  ND.

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Well said!   Good words for the New Year.

RussN

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Same here! My Dnepr MT-11 is the most fun motorcycle I've ever owned despite the fact I had to take it completely apart, modify or fix, and adjust just about everything, then reassemble it. The last part I had to file, then chisel apart, and tack weld correctly timed was the sidecar drum brake actuation arm. Whoever punched out the square hole the cam fits in and gets welded up got it so far off I was unable to adjust the new sidecar brake cable so the sidecar brake would actually work with the rear brake before it hit the brake backing plate where the brake cable adjuster screws in. I thought I had a stretched sidecar brake cable but the new cable was exactly the same as the old cable. At least I have a slightly used spare sidecar brake cable now. I also know the sidecar brake works because it locked up and skidded as I was going down hill when it rolled over some wet leaves in the road. Always a fun time on my old Russian Iron Steed!

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Speaking of brakes,  I was so disappointed when after all my efforts to set the front brake shoes perfectly, and then cleaning up the drum surfaces and shoes with 120 grit sandpaper for bite then rubbing alcohol for cleanliness the stopping power was still dismal.  As if I had greased the damn things. I spent a lot of time on this.

But now only a 100 km later I have very good brakes!  It’s as if it just took a while for the surfaces to perfectly mate and I can actually dive the front forks now.  I’ve read that feathering in pads and drum shoes is an art or maybe voodoo magic,  there must be some truth to this.  ND.

 

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NDuck:

Yes, setting in the shoes to the drum surfaces takes some time. But there are quicker ways to do it:

For my various Urals I acquired narrow rolls of sanpaper strips with light adhesive backing, and pressed them onto the cleaned drum surface.  Then I turned the wheel by hand while sanding the shoe surfaces in position in the drum.  That process greatly decreased the setting-in time.  I also lightly beveled the leading and trailing edges of the shoes (with a file), which eliminated vibrations when applying the brakes.  I can lock up the wheels using the brakes, if required.

RussN

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  • 3 weeks later...

Finally turned my attention back to finishing the sidecar, starting with new rubber bushes and axle for the swing arm.  

I had some difficulty checking the toe-in but as far as I can see there isn’t the 10mm specified in the manual.  I’m relying on lumber for straight edges.....  I’m tempted to road test it first because any adjustment will involve a torch and swear fest to free up the adjustable ball mount at the rear.   If ok I’ll start working on the tub, interior etc.

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Adjusted toe in, mounted the tub, seats etc and took it for a ride.  Slow speed wobble....not a tank slapper but difficult to manage until 30 km/h then it disappears.  Stopped in parking lot to check head bearings and mounting bolts, everything seems ok.

limped back home and looking at threads it seems it can be a number of things but some bit of wobble is normal and can be dealt with by getting the steering damper properly adjusted.

Checked tire pressures, nipped up excessive slack in the sidecar wheel bearing and went for a 30 km ride, playing with damper.  Seems a bit better but I’m also dealing with learning how to handle a rig, I’ve never ridden a sidecar before today.  Arms are burning....

It could still be improper sidecar alignment or maybe  it’s as good as it gets.  I’ll ride some more and recheck alignment.

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Progress!

Several other things that can cause front wheel wobble:

Slight toe-in of the sidecar helps balance the rig handling.  Yes, the rear tire will scuff and wear a bit that way, but so be it.

Also, a front tire with flat tread profile will definitely induce wobble.  So make sure the tread is nicely rounded.

Keep posting!

RussN

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Still have the wobble up to 30km/hr.  The rig tracks perfectly straight at 50-60 km/h.  Haven’t rechecked alignment yet but it can’t be that far off the mark.  Went for 50 km in light snow today,  had power steering here and there!!FA1734F5-A950-4D93-94D2-26C7EA328FC7.jpeg.a27287db13caeb9b7f24ec82086d999d.jpeg

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  • 4 months later...

Went for the first long ride this year, made up some new ignition wires which were dodgy before and finally have the regulator adjusted, sitting around 14v.  Running very well, still have tweaking to do as ever.  200km in the sun, nice change after riding it in the rain and snow.  Had a bad plug too, never happened to me before so running mismatched plugs until I can get another.  Oh well.
Best wishes.

ND.

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