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Buy a new Ural?


Chappo
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Hi

I'm thinking of buying a new Ural, maybe a Tourist. I have a new Kawasaki 1400GTR that's only done 5500km. I am retired and recently had an accident on my mountain bike (not motorbike) and spent a week in hospital and realise I was lucky not to have lost the use of one hand. Whilst lying there looking at the ceiling I sort of decided to look at selling the Kawasaki and getting a Ural as I ride the Kawasaki to the wire all the time and need to slow down. I reckon the Ural would be good for little outings to the beach and so on. I am actually happy that the Ural is not a speed machine.

However from looking at the forums I get the distint impression that it's very much a hands on bike in the sense that you have to be a bit of a back yard mechanic and tinker with this or that a lot. That would be the last thing I would want.

So what I am asking is is the Ural reliable and tune-ups can be done by the service agent at service time. I realise all new bikes need a tweak here or there. I've been back a few times to have the throttle adjusted on the Kawasaki for example. Well that's not something I am not comfortable with and I just leave that sort of thing to the experts.

Hoping someone can help.

I come from Camden, NSW just outside of Sydney. I am hoping to look at a Ural at Canterbury tomorrow and see if it grabs me.

Thanks

Neill Chapman

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D'day Chappo,

I would think that wanting to "fiddle" with a Ural would make living with it somewhat easier, but not all Ural ownwers do their own serving. Reliabilty is now quite good, my bike's performance and fuel consumption keeps on improving. Any half way competent motorcycle mechanic could perform all necessary service and maintenance functions for you. You just need to find an "old school" type mechanic.

My 2009 Ural has travelled over 60,000km without any major problems, and I am planning to ride to the OCR Bramwell Station rally in August, a trip which will run to over 12,000km.

I enjoy working on the Ural, but don't do much to my other vehicles. Not doing your own work will not prevent you from enjoying or riding a Ural outfit.

Partick is a fellow Ural rider living close to you. I will PM his contact details to you.

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However from looking at the forums I get the distint impression that it's very much a hands on bike in the sense that you have to be a bit of a back yard mechanic and tinker with this or that a lot. That would be the last thing I would want.

So what I am asking is is the Ural reliable and tune-ups can be done by the service agent at service time. I realise all new bikes need a tweak here or there. I've been back a few times to have the throttle adjusted on the Kawasaki for example. Well that's not something I am not comfortable with and I just leave that sort of thing to the experts.

 

G'day Neill

 

I'm up at Newcastle... give me a yell if can help. If you want to come up I'll take you for a spin.

 

I consider a willingness to tinker fairly important, the big difference between the Ural and something like the Kawasaki is that the Ural is not intimidating. You can fiddle without having an engineering degree.

 

I have to disagree with Norm a bit - compared to the GTR there are regular checks needed between services. Things like oil levels, tyre pressures, spokes etc actually need to be done rather than given lip service as they would be on a Japanese bike. In my opinion treating it like a Japanese bike is asking for trouble, you can't just ride it then stick it in the garage until next time and only kick the tyres between services. It's not big things, but the little things that need to be kept on top of.

 

Anyhow, that's how I see it. There's no point in whitewashing things and having you disappointed. That doesn't help you and doesn't help Ural when you tell people. On the other hand Norm certainly has the runs on the board...

 

 

Ross

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Go for it :biggrin: I to was a rider on the edge with my RT and GT. Me thinks that the Ural was a great answer to my need to ride and slow down to see the sights ad smell the flowers along the way. There is a ton of info on basic maintatence and how to video's that will give you more confidence in doing some of your own work. You will find riders who have been there and done that so you should have plenty of good council. :cheers:

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Oh Ross, I have to agree with you. But I don't count checking oil and air and the like as "fiddling" or even maintenance. It's what I do before every ride on any bike. I know a few Uralists who outsource regular servicing, and fixing bits that break, and this what I was referring to. Playing with these IS fun, and rewarding, and easy. It's also an important part, for most of us, of enjoying the Ural experience to the max.

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I'm pretty new (675klm) on a Ural and had the same concerns as you....although the forums are an excellent source of info they can really make you second guess whether or not you want one... i am a hands on guy and am mechanical, but i wasn't sure whether i wanted to "tinker" or just ride.However after looking at the simplicity of the bike and not being able to wipe the poop eatin grin of my face at driving my rig thru two major snow storms i'm hooked and can't get enough of riding it...also, i've found there are enough good people in here more than happy to share their expertise to any problems you may come across. :cheers:

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They are more maintenance intensive, but only in terms of having to do stuff that have slipped from modern automotive vehicle ownership. My Nissan and Mazda are the modern - don't touch, service every 10K km. My BMW and Citroen (50 and 60 years old respectively) and my Ural when finshed require checking over once a week, checking oils, tire pressures, bits and bobs here and there, that sort of thing. It's a bonding thing, I feel. On the old stuff, it's also where you check the bodywork, clean out rust before it gets out of hand, repair the small stuff before they grow.

A new Ural should be great - you treat it like a classic but it's got modernity - no rust, no paint chips, nothing that can grow and need sorting out - it's new! You can get it serviced by any good mechanic and they're easy enough for you to learn the skills needed to keep them going right. Soon it'll just be a case of taking the bike in for major stuff that require specialised tools as you'll be able to sort out the wee things in a timely manner in the comforts of your own garage/shed/kitchen table...

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Oh Ross, I have to agree with you. But I don't count checking oil and air and the like as "fiddling" or even maintenance.

 

Same here, but as someone who came to the Ural from a Honda ST1100 I reckon Neill might well count it as fiddling. With something like the ST or a GTR you might well only check the tyres a few times and nothing else between services.

 

From what he said Neill might be thinking in those terms and it might be an issue. Just guessing of course!

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  • 5 weeks later...

I'm also thinking about a Ural Outfit. Anyone in the Southern Highlands area south of Sydney have a Ural. If so, would like to hear from you with a view to seeing your outfit, and finding out a bit more.

cheers Twin track

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  • 5 months later...

Good evening Lads,

 

A new Ural tragic here. My current ride will hopefully be gone next week and that will mean a Ural will enter my life within the next 4 weeks with a bit of luck. Just thought I would say hi and I look forward to enjoying a Ural for many many years to come.

 

Adam

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Thanks Rob,

 

I am looking forward to seeing as much of the state as I can on 3 wheels and at a slower pace. I have decided on a Tourist when the time comes, hopefully in the dark green.

 

To save myself the costs involved in freight and time away from work, I am looking to order and collect from Derrick at Eurobrit in Melbourne. I have spoken to him briefly on the phone and he could not have been more helpful. I could hear phones ringing in the background and people talking and he still happily answered all my stupid questions without rushing to hang up. Not sure what dealings others have had with him but his manner on the phone alone was enough to secure a sale.

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