Jump to content

Setter_Chauffer

Members
  • Posts

    11
  • Joined

  • Last visited

Everything posted by Setter_Chauffer

  1. I have a 2000 Ural Deco Classic with electric start and reverse gear. About 5000 miles ago, I dropped a tool and sheared off the reverse-throw set-screw at the back of the tranny flush to the case. Since then, the screw has migrated in the “right” direction, that is, the one that impedes getting into reverse, but does not lock out the forward gears. As a result, I can engage enough of the reverse gear to use it for a dodgy parking brake, but not for actual rearward motion. With the transmission still in the bike, I made several futile attempts to remove the stub of the screw. But I found the location inaccessible and gave up. Recently I bit the bullet and took the transmission out. Picture # 1 is the rear view of same. Picture #2 is a close-up of where reverse-throw set-screw SHOULD be. And here is where my big mystery begins: I could swear that the set screw resided in the left-hand and shorter of the two near-circular projecting posts that together form a figure-eight. And that would be consistent with the tool marks on that post that I made in my attempts to remove the stub of the screw while the transmission was still in the bike. But, as in the Picture #3—as well as in every photo and diagram of Ural & Dnepr transmissions I have looked at going back to dirt—the set screw sits in the right-hand post. Further, the right-hand post on my transmission is as smooth as a baby’s bottom, with no stub of a screw visible, as if there had never been one at all! So, amateur that I am, I just cannot figure it out. Do I have a rare model exception in which the screw is indeed on the left? Or no screw at all? Can the sheared-off stub—assuming it is in the right-hand position where it should be—have been so-well camouflaged by oxidation and grime across seven-odd years so as to give no surface appearance? Am I safe to just telling the machinist to drill-and-extract at the center of the right-hand post? Or do I need to do an “exploratory disassembly” to determine the true state of affairs? Or is there something else that you-all will no doubt think of? Thanks and blessings for any and all responses!
  2. Thank you Malamute. As you can read from my post in response to Russian Bike Nut, my latest research into selling it has led me to keep it for now. But I will post more current and complete photos for purposes of salivary entertainment.
  3. Thank you Russian Bike Nut. Photo session with bile yesterday renewed affection. Decided not to sell for now. Will upgrade post with photos soon so you can swoon. Besides, my research shows values increasing. Perhaps keep in reserve for burial insurance and be interred in tub. If (he says hopefully) present engine does not endure, favor BMW R90 power train as I owned one once and it was nice and smooth. Did you do your own installs of upgrades? If so, can you guide me to guidance? If not, who did? (They have everything in LA, right?) Looking from Central Arkansas, the nearest shops that sell and (say they) service Urals are either "Powersports" (tr. checkered jacket and pressure sales) or "Joes Lawnmower and Ural." (Well, it is kind of a tractor.) Closest ones I would trust to lay hands on are in Florida, Michigan and Northern California … 1000 mi almost to the door for first, Gene Langford at Holopaw Ural, who put in my engine.
  4. Reviewing this string of posts nearly a year later, I'm a little shamed that I have not kindly thanked all respondents sooner. If Malamute is still around and interested, yes I would be willing to sell the sidecar separately and even - given spousal permission - deliver it (attached to bike) for suitable fee.
  5. 75 MPH definitely: I grok it as greater power of 2010 motor and especially tall final drive ration in 2000 Decos compared to other models.
  6. Runs strong: 75 mph uphill, headwind, "shields up" and passenger in tub. (I did not believe it at first either. Maybe combination of tall final drive ratio in this model, a little more power in 750 cc motor and Ducati ignition at time of install.) Clean but "aesthetically distressed" i.e., normal wear and tear for age/km - ridden regularly 27,000 km and change 10,000 km and change on new 2010 motor, Nippon Denso alternator (Ukranian hand grenade did in old motor), starter (have all receipts for install). All done by Gene Langford at Holopaw Ural who heat-bends kick-starter so you get to keep it. In addition to all the lovely Deco chrome, accessories & extras include: -Tub tonneau, white -Tub and bike windshields -Law enforcement saddle -Original Deco saddle (unmounted) -Trunk-mounted luggage rack -Fourth wheel and tire w/trunk-mount fixture -Spotlights -Tank-side reverse shifter -Ural jerry-can (3 gal?) & mounting bracket, beige primer -Complete original tool kit -Owner's and service manuals (such as they are) New owner may want to pull tranny and replace bolt sticking out the back that controls & adjusts reverse-gear shifter throw (total of $1.50 in parts). It broke off along with locknut flush with the case at some point (probably when Klutzmeyer here was changing clutch cable) and has migrated outward, partially disabling reverse function, meaning I catch enough of reverse to act as parking brake, but not to back up. I have not done the job yet myself as situation has been stable 9000+km, I don't routinely drive around in reverse, all else works as it should, and I the enjoy sin of sloth. New owner will also want to get new clutch handle/lever as Kawasaki replacement (don't ask) unduly shortens life of cable. $5500 firm, given my scientific survey of current asking/selling prices. Why am I selling? Age-related orthopoedic and neurological impairments and impairment-related wishes of spouse. Buyer may give me extra years of life: if I don't get my price by summer 2020, I'll try driving it to CA as gift to nephews. But enthusiast will give it a far better home. Cheerio. Ciao. Namaste. Aloha. Salaam Malakum. God Bless. Dobroe Noche, and be sure to read your Dostoevsky - best way I know to grok The Spirit of Ural.
  7. Dear SB#3, Pleas forgive my delayed thanks. Owing to much other business, is the first time I have signed on to the site since I posted my plea. Thanks so much for confirming my sanity and for the additional suggestions. Since you responded the day after my post, I assume that the 72 subsequent readers must have thought you right on the money, as none of them has had anything to add or subtract. It looks like you have a really neat collection. Can I ride them all sometime? With gratitude and respect, -Tom
  8. Please, as I am only a minimally skilled amateur mechanic, I can use all the collective wisdom of membership! Grateful for any response. Please assume that WD40 has been liberally applied & left overnight prior to procedure. My plan at this point: 1) punch dimple dead center in end of sheared bolt; 2) use three reverse-twist (left hand) drill bits of increasing size and with the very lightest touch of pressure to bore shallow hole in end of bolt; 3) If drilling itself does not start turning the bolt out enough to grab w/fingers or pliers, try using phillips screwdriver w/light pressure in hole to rotate it out; 4) Now if (3) does not work - and here is the step that makes me choke because of the notorious unreliability of the method, ie breaking the tool off in the hole in the end of the bolt - use one of those "extract-all" (or some such name) tools to grab inside the hole and rotate it out. Next part: It appears (I am happy to be corrected) from sources already consulted, that something like 1/2-3/4 in (1-2 cm) of outward rotation will completely restore function of reverse. If bolt sticks out the greater length, should I not be able to screw on a locknut and then file the tip of the bolt so as to turn with a wrench? If bolt sticks out the shorter length, could I not cut a screwdriver slot in it and then fasten the lock nut? I am sure that many members have faced similar situations and have just as many ways of doing this job. Any input will be greatly appreciated. Respectfully yours, Setter Chauffer
  9. Please, as I am only a minimally skilled amateur mechanic, I can use all the collective wisdom of membership! Grateful for any response. Please assume that WD40 has been liberally applied & left overnight prior to procedure. My plan at this point: 1) punch dimple dead center in end of sheared bolt; 2) use three reverse-twist (left hand) drill bits of increasing size and with the very lightest touch of pressure to bore shallow hole in end of bolt; 3) If drilling itself does not start turning the bolt out enough to grab w/fingers or pliers, try using phillips screwdriver w/light pressure in hole to rotate it out; 4) Now if (3) does not work - and here is the step that makes me choke because of the notorious unreliability of the method, ie breaking the tool off in the hole in the end of the bolt - use one of those "extract-all" (or some such name) tools to grab inside the hole and rotate it out. Next part: It appears (I am happy to be corrected) from sources already consulted, that something like 1/2-3/4 in (1-2 cm) of outward rotation will completely restore function of reverse. If bolt sticks out the greater length, should I not be able to screw on a locknut and then file the tip of the bolt so as to turn with a wrench? If bolt sticks out the shorter length, could I not cut a screwdriver slot in it and then fasten the lock nut? I am sure that many members have faced similar situations and have just as many ways of doing this job. Any input will be greatly appreciated. Respectfully yours, Setter Chauffer
  10. This is the bolt with locknut that sticks out of the back of the transmission and by screwing in and out controls the rearward throw of the reversing mechanism. When screwed too far in, reverse does not engage or does not fully engage. This is my situation, bolt being sheared off flush to transmission case. My Ural Guru tells me these bolts and corresponding threads in case are differently machined. So I suppose safest bet is one from that year (2001). If the one you provide does not work, I will pay shipping back to you. In my current post on bolt extraction I am looking for tips. Thank you, Setter Chauffer
×
×
  • Create New...