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PeteT

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About PeteT

  • Birthday 07/10/1954

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    orickmachine@yahoo.com

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  • Location
    Las Vegas, Nevada, USA
  • Interests
    Motorcycling, hobby machine work, fabrication, mechanical design and prototype work, target shooting, gunsmithing, travel, camping, hiking, fishing, hunting, avoiding housework, etc.

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  • My Bike(s)
    2005 Gear-Up
  • My Story
    What can I say? I'm an aircraft mechanic by trade, and my hobbies are amature machinist work, shooting/gunsmithing, and of course- motorcycles. I also have a 1981 BMW R100S and a 1980 Yamaha DT-175 (for transportation to and from work). I live and work in Las Vegas, Nevada.

PeteT's Achievements

Russian Bike Nut

Russian Bike Nut (3/3)

  1. PeteT

    Mercury

    Heck- when I was in elementry school (back when dinosaurs still roamed the earth), our teacher would give one of us a teaspoon of the stuff, and we'd pass it around so that every kid got a chance to play with it. No rubber gloves, respirators, or any of that sissy stuff. Made my generation what it is today! PeteT.
  2. Greetings, 2%! I'm beginning to run low on suggestions, but I still have a couple to throw out there. When you wrote that you "filed the slots", it jogged my brain a little. It's hell to get old. First your eyesight goes... and then your memory! Anyway, I remember something I ran into when I was experementing with mine; the flat piece that goes under the nut on the end of the cam shaft (the one that drives the mechanical advance) can be installed upside down. Because the forks at the ends of it are offset, it will cause the points "box" (for want of a better term) to be in a different place in relation to the cam if it's turned over. If it's upside down, the slots in the box won't allow the box to be turned far enough to properly time the points. Or, to look at it in a different way- let's say that you've timed the points to the engine, and then remove the advance mechanism for some reason. When you re-install the advance mechanism, if the flat plate with the forks at the ends is installed upside down, the engine will be waaaaay out of time. Have a look and see if this is why yours needs to be filed in order to be timed properly. Also, while you have the degree wheel handy, install it on the end of the cam shaft and while using a small test light, turn the engine until the points just open and note the reading on the degree wheel. Now, continue turning the engine until the other cam lobe opens the points and compare the readings. If they're not exactly 180 degrees apart (or within a couple of degrees), the points cam could be improperly ground. I had this problem when I was experementing. Drove me insane for a couple of days before I discovered the cause. A cam that's a little off center could cause problems as well- if the point gap changes depending on which lobe is opening the points it could cause it to run poorly (or not at all) on one cylinder. Once you've checked for consistent voltage at the coil, do the "open and close the points with your fingernail with the ignition switch on" test and check for a good, strong spark at the spark plugs. If you have a good spark every time, put the advance mechanism back in and time it- being sure to get the flat piece in right side up. If it still doesn't run, there must be some other problem than the ignition system, such as fuel (carburetion, plugged air cleaner, chokes, etc.) or compression (valve leakage/adjustment, piston/cylinder leakage, etc.) As always, keep us informed of your findings... and try not to get burned out. Go play some golf and unwind! PeteT.
  3. Previet, gospoden 2%, Kak de la?<IMG class=bbc_emoticon alt= src="http://www.russianiron.com/forums/public/style_emoticons/default/biggrin.gif"> Have you tried cursing at it yet in a language it understands?<IMG class=bbc_emoticon alt= src="http://www.russianiron.com/forums/public/style_emoticons/default/laugh.gif"> <BR><BR><BR><BR>OK- it looks like it's time to go back to the basics with this problem. Sometimes it's the silly, stupid stuff that's easily overlooked that causes the greatest headaches. Before you go "Tiger Woods" on us, let's go back to step one. And remember- as the author Mark Twain once said: "The game of golf is a perfect way to screw up a good walk".<BR><BR><BR><BR>Just so we're both on the same page, when I'm refering to the terminals on the ignition coil, I'll refer to the primary winding connections (the small ones) as "battery terminal" (the one that goes to the ignition switch), and "points terminal" (the one that's wired to the breaker points). The "secondary towers" will be where the spark plug wires enter the ignition coil.<BR><BR><BR><BR>You will be needing a multimeter. I recomend the old "analog" type that uses a moving needle, and not the newer "digital" type. The digital meter has too much lag time due to it's slow sampling rate, and is harder to read and understand in this application than the moving needle analog type.<BR><BR><BR><BR>When reading voltage, connect one meter lead (the + in your case) to the frame or the engine case. Check the connection by touching the other lead to the battery (- terminal in your case) to make sure the meter is working properly. There are few things worse than trying to troubleshoot your test equipment at the same time you're trying to troubleshoot a problem.<BR><BR><BR><BR>When I use the term "ground" (or "earth"), I mean the frame or engine case.<BR><BR><BR><BR><BR><BR>And now once more into the breech!<BR><BR><BR><BR>1). Check for play in the camshaft bearings and mechanical advance:<BR><BR><BR><BR>Grasp the end of the camshaft where the mechanical advance attaches, and try to move it up and down, and from side to side. If there is any "slop", "play" or looseness, it will effect the operation of the points, causing them to open and close erraticly because of the effect on the gap setting. Play or slop between the points cam and the part of the advance mechanism it rotates on can also be a factor. Do you have any play, ie: enough to equal 20% or so of the point gap? If "yes", you will need to correct it by repalcing the camshaft bearings, or converting to electronig ignition.. Electronic ignition is more forgiving in this respect because it doesn't rely on a radial gap setting like points do. If little or no play, go on to Step #2.<BR><BR><BR><BR>2). Condition of the breaker points set.<BR><BR><BR><BR>Check the point contacts for pitting. Sometimes a "tit" will build up on one contact, with a corresponding "pit" on the other contact. This can cause irratic contact if the points don't line up perfectly each time. If needed, remove the "tit" with a flat file. Avoid using sand paper or emory board. The particles from sand paper (silicon carbide or aluminum oxide) don't conduct electricity and can cause the points to not make contact. If the points are quickly becoming excessively pitted, suspect the condensor. If they become burned too soon, it could be from oil contamination (from leakage past the camshaft seal or by oil from the fingers if touched while installing), or due to excessive current flow- usually due to a coil that draws too many amps (more that five amps). <BR><BR><BR><BR>With the condensor and the wire to the "points" terminal disconnected, attach an ohm meter to the moving and fixed sides of the points and open and close them several times. Does the meter show continuity and open circuit when the points open and close? Sometimes points can fail by shorting to ground while opening and closing, which is not a good thing. I've encountered this before with Japaneese and U.S. made points... and I can only imagine what Eastern Block points must be like <IMG class=bbc_emoticon alt= src="http://www.russianiron.com/forums/public/style_emoticons/default/ohmy.gif">! If the points set tests OK, procede to Step #3.<BR><BR><BR><BR>3). Check for power to the system:<BR><BR>Re-attach the condensor and primary wire to the points. Turn the engine until the points are closed, and turn on the ignition. Check for 6 volts at the coil "battery" terminal. This is a very useful test because it tests the wiring under an actual load.. If the voltage shown is zero, or less than 90% of the actual voltage of the battery, check for voltage where the wire connects to the ignition switch. If still no voltage, check the ignition switch, and so on and so forth back to the battery. If you have 6 or so volts at the coil "Battery" terminal, procede to Step #4.<BR><BR><BR><BR>4). Operational test of the ignition system:<BR><BR>Remove the advance mechanisim to provide access to the points. Remove the spark plugs and lay them on the cylinders with the spark plug leads attached. Insure the spark plugs are making good contact (ground) with the cylinder fins. Turn on the ignition switch and using your finger nail or a small screwdriver, open and close the points several times. You should get a good blue or purple spark at each spark plug (and possibly a slight spark at the points if the room you are in is dark- this is normal). Each time you open the points, you should get a consistant spark at both spark plugs. If you have one spark plug that isn't firing, try swapping the spark plugs and see if the problem follows the spark plug to the other side. If yes- replace the spark plug with one known to be good. (I've encountered brand new spark plugs that were bad right from the box). If the problem doesn't follow, try switching the spark plug leads from side to side. It's possible that one of the leads is bad- especially if it's a carbon resistance type. If that doesn't do it, it there could be a problem with the coil. Check that the spark plug leads are fully inserted to the bottoms of the coil towers. If everything seems as it should be, reinstall the advance mechanism, adjust the points gap and timing (for about the one millionth time <IMG src="http://www.russianiron.com/forums/public/style_emoticons/default/dry.gif"> , and procede to Step #5.<BR><BR><BR><BR>5).It's not uncommon for spark plugs to spark OK while sitting on the cylinder in the open air, only to fail to spark when under pressure. If you still have a miss or failure to fire, try replacing the spark plugs with known good ones. If the missing and poor operation persists, attach wires to a small light bulb (tail light or indicator light size), and attach one wire to the coil "Battery" terminal, and the other wire to ground. While the engine is running, check to see that the bulb is illuminated steadily, and that it doesn't blink on and off erraticly while jiggling the ignition switch or the wiring. There may be a bad connection that only shows up when there is vibration from the engine. This could also be the case with the wire between the points and the coil. Also, try moving the steering from side to side- you could have a bad connection or short where the wiring leaves the headlight shell.<BR><BR>There could also be a remote posibility that the problem is not ignition related. If it ran OK after it had a chance to get warm, it could be a valve (or valves) that are set a little too tight and are leaking when cold.. When the engine is warm, the cylinders actually "grow", or get longer. If the valve clearences are set with the cylinders warm, when they cool they get shorter and this causes the gap to become smaller. If the clearence shrinks to zero, the valve isn't allowed to fully close, causing low compression and in the case of a tight intake valve, fuel mixture issues as well. This is worth a look if all else fails.<IMG class=bbc_emoticon alt=:unsure2: src="http://www.russianiron.com/forums/public/style_emoticons/default/unsure.gif"> <BR><BR><BR>If you reach this point and still have not identified the problem, your bike is clearly posessed by Satan, and the only reasonable thing left to do is to take up golf.<IMG class=bbc_emoticon alt= src="http://www.russianiron.com/forums/public/style_emoticons/default/laugh.gif"> <BR><BR>Let us know what you find....<BR><BR>PeteT. <BR><BR><BR><BR><BR><BR> <BR><BR><BR><BR><BR><BR><BR><BR>.<BR><BR><BR><BR>.
  4. Pete just to confirm that I have understood you correctly... You wrote: "It looks like you could get the same results (isolating the coil or points assembly) simply by reversing the primary wires at the coil, without going to a negative ground system". I understand: Isolating the coil because its the easiest... then swiching the the two wires going to the coil.... making the wire going from the coil to the circit breaker + (The traditional "modern" way of wiring). this terminal will then also have to share the wire comming from the ignition switch and the ground will have to com from the battery??? Or are you thinking of omitting the origianl ignition switch and replace it with its own toggle. I couldn't agree with you more on redoing the wiring and get on with the fun stuff but I would lke to do some riding first. I re-wired our small pleasure boat and I haven't regreated it once. Boats are funky too because they are fiberglass all wiring make a round trip back to the main ground terminal. Not so bad when you get the hang of it... LOL. Good morning,2%! Actually, we've been looking at this the hard way. None of the terminals on the coil should have any electrical connection to the coil's mounting points- therefore, it's already isolated from it's mount . You can check the coil with a multimeter...with all wires disconnected there should be no connection between the terminals, primary or output, to the mounting screws. So- if the coil primary terminals are reversed (battery terminal now goes to points, and points now goes to battery), the coil should be tricked into thinking it's installed in a negative ground system even if it's not . Give it a try. If it still doesn't run right, check with a meter for 6 Volts at the "battery" terminal of the coil with the ignition switch "on". If the voltage is low or zero, you have an issue with the wiring harness. Also, with the switch "on", check the voltage at the "points" terminal of the coil. As you turn the engine, the voltage should jump from 6 Volts to zero and back to 6 if the points are opening and closing and the wire to them is intact.. If this checks out OK, and it still doesn't run right- the timing may be off or the point gap may be too wide and you'll have to go back into that bloody box and take care of that again. At this point, taking up golf is probably beginning to look pretty attractive! Let us know how it goes.... PeteT.
  5. D'oh!- it just occured to me. Looking at the schematic, It looks like you could get the same results (isolating the coil or points assembly) simply by reversing the primary wires at the coil, without going to a negative ground system!!! Give it a try- it just might work. When dealing with a bike that's been through a lot of years and former owners, it usually pays to give it a re-wire job. Working with an old, questionable harness can be pretty frustrating- problems just seem to appear and disappear with no explaination.I generally just rip out all of the old wire, and go to work with a roll of new wire and a good supply of crimp terminals. There's not too much to it- just do one system at a time; ignition, headlight, tail light, and so on. I generally don't bother with different colored wire... usually by the time you're working on it again the colors have faded anyway. All in all, it sounds like you're well on your way to having a well sorted Dnepr- keep up the good work! PeteT.
  6. this is an extremely complex, convoluted issue- no doubt about that. But I suspect, the "corporations" are really not much more than useful idiots, serving a more sinister group. Let me explain. Here in the U.S. we are in the early stages of an election that is of critical importance to both of our major political parties. The politicians of both parties rely on public perception for their very survival. The traditional media have been working hand in hand with the government for decades, providing the necessary public preception required by both parties. The traditional media has been reliable and comfortable to work with, and has proven to be easy to manipulate in order to serve the needs of the government. What scares both parties spitless is an internet over which they have no control. Until now. The corporations provide useful cover, and are more than happy to provide support for this project. They have something to gain from this legislation, and they also serve to give the whole thing credibility. But they don't want this half as much as our government does right now- what with congress's approval rating at 11% (lowest in history), a major election looming and things ready to blow up both at home and abroad. The last thing they want or need is an independent source of information, available to everyone. The government wants this so bad they can taste it... and are prepaired to do whatever must be done to get it. Even if it means ticking off the rest of the world. What can we do? I truly don't know... but I think we're in too deep to vote ourselves out. Rant off. PeteT.
  7. Greetings, 2%! Actually, there is only one condensor used... it's mounted at the coil, which is mounted under the seat just behind the airbox in this case. One could mount a condensor for each point set... but I'm cheap! If you have the advance taking place between 1700-1900 RPM, that's within spec. now we know why someone tampered with the spring. Sometimes you just gotta do what you gotta do . The thing you wrote about wiring the battery up directly made me go "Hmmmmmmm.....". When you say "I have + to the frame", does this mean "positive earth" or "positive ground"? There might be a reverse polarity issue here. Some ignition coils don't work well if the polarity is reversed. If you're using the same Harley coil I am, it is designed for a negative ground. This could be part of the poor running issue. The "two automotive coils" may also be designed for "negative ground" operation. It looks like you've proven that it *will* run properly with the parts and pieces you have- it's just a matter of getting everything working with everything else. My guess is that while tightening the timing unit, the point gap got altered- probably closed completely. The PM302 setup is a real "pain in the zhopa" to work with, being that the working parts are located down in the bottom of that Gawdforsaken box! Don't give up- it sounds like you're making good progress in getting this sorted. Dealing with old equipment, especially equipment that's been buggered by numorous previous owners, is a lot like a circus juggling act. At first, you're trying to juggle more balls than you can handle. But, if you eliminate one ball at a time, it will eventually become manageable. And the best part is that we can all learn something from the process. And..... there's always golf! PeteT. Pete, A Flash of lightning struck me tonight while I was in the garage giving my bike dirty looks again.... and as you noticed and I didn't even thou I wrote it yesterday.... its a positive ground issue. I amalmost certain. I removed the coil from thouse really nice mounts I fabricated and wrapt it in rubber gasket material insulating it from the bike and it fired at once. I will run a ground wire from the battery tomorrow and see if it will improve running. I hope I haven't damaged the coil... just my luck. How will this effect the wiring to the points.... now I'm abit hesitant and unsure. I knew there was a reason why i didn't like positiv ground.... it gets me all confused. What is strange is that it ran quit well yesterday... thats strange..... The car coils situation may have the same issues as it didn't run clean when I got it either. I decided to call it a night on a good note so I sleep well. to be continued..... Which wire should run to the points.... if I insulat the coil from the bike properly ? Hi, 2%! Don't worry about hurting the coil. About the only way to hurt this type of coil is by hooking it up to too high a voltage and burning it out. Reversing the polarity will do no lasting harm as well (this is more than can be said for most solid state units). In fact, in magneto systems, the current is provided by an A.C. generator contained within the mag. The polarity across the points actually changes every time the mag fires. Magnetos use the same circuit a battery/coil system uses, the only difference being where the current comes from- a battery or a generator. Just a little bit of distracting trivia . I have a hunch that when you got it to run well yesterday, you had it wired up directly to the battery, and the coil was happy with the direction of the current flow through it. I don't know whether the older Dneprs were originally positive ground or negative ground, but if positive ground you could probably convert it over to negative ground without too much work. You might have to use a different voltage regulator, but everything else (lights, horn, etc.) should work OK with either polarity. The wiring for the ignition system should be the same for either polarity (see attachment). I think I might see a problem with running a wire from the battery negative terminal to the coil. If the bike is positive ground,(+), that will make the ground at the points positive (+) also. This will result in no current flow through the primary coil windings- no differential of voltage across the primary windings. Trace the current flow between the negative and positive of the battery, and I think you'll see what I mean. For right now, if you'd like to experement a bit, try reversing the battery cables to make it a negative ground system- but first, disconnect the voltage regulator, as it may not like having it's polarity reversed! If you wanted to retain the positive ground setup, the "fixed", or non-moving side of the points would have to be electrically isolated from the grounded structure of the engine. This could probably be done by mounting the PM302 assembly on a thin nylon gasket and using insulating bushings on the mounting screws, but this would add a degree of dificulty that would impress an East German Olympic judge! Trace the current flow between the negative and positive of the battery, and I think you'll see what I mean. It looks like you're getting a good education about points style ignition systems. This is the best way to learn!! Keep us posted..... PeteT.
  8. Greetings, 2%! Actually, there is only one condensor used... it's mounted at the coil, which is mounted under the seat just behind the airbox in this case. One could mount a condensor for each point set... but I'm cheap! If you have the advance taking place between 1700-1900 RPM, that's within spec. now we know why someone tampered with the spring. Sometimes you just gotta do what you gotta do . The thing you wrote about wiring the battery up directly made me go "Hmmmmmmm.....". When you say "I have + to the frame", does this mean "positive earth" or "positive ground"? There might be a reverse polarity issue here. Some ignition coils don't work well if the polarity is reversed. If you're using the same Harley coil I am, it is designed for a negative ground. This could be part of the poor running issue. The "two automotive coils" may also be designed for "negative ground" operation. It looks like you've proven that it *will* run properly with the parts and pieces you have- it's just a matter of getting everything working with everything else. My guess is that while tightening the timing unit, the point gap got altered- probably closed completely. The PM302 setup is a real "pain in the zhopa" to work with, being that the working parts are located down in the bottom of that Gawdforsaken box! Don't give up- it sounds like you're making good progress in getting this sorted. Dealing with old equipment, especially equipment that's been buggered by numorous previous owners, is a lot like a circus juggling act. At first, you're trying to juggle more balls than you can handle. But, if you eliminate one ball at a time, it will eventually become manageable. And the best part is that we can all learn something from the process. And..... there's always golf! PeteT.
  9. Greetings! I don't think the shaft surface was the culprit in this case. It was the build quality of the parts I was using, which was frankly...horible! I stole the cam out of one and used it to work the points on the first plate i made. After much bewilderment as to why it wouldn't stay in time, I discovered that the lobes weren't ground 180 degrees apart. Tried another cam and it made a huge difference! The first one looked like it had been ground by hand on a bench grinder. I'm pretty sure all three units I had came from the same batch, and looked to be new production. PeteT.
  10. Howdy, 2%!<BR><BR>It looks like you've figured it out! Being a waste spark engine, it doesn't matter much which points set is doing the work,only their position relative to the cam. The toggle switch I used is a marine grade DPST (double pole, single throw) type. A wire runs from each points set to either side of the switch, and the switch connects one set or the other to the primary of the ignition coil. The switch gets a lot of use, being cycled every time I stop or go... but it's lasted three years so far with no issues. I still keep a spare in the took kit. <BR><BR>OK- here's the setup I've been using for the last three years. I tried several different versions before settling on this one. With this one, the points plate is made in two parts: the large outside part that bolts to the engine case, and a smaller inner plate that the points actually attach to. The mounting plate uses flush screws, so that the whole assembly can be removed and replaced without changing the timing- the tapered screws "find the center" while being tightened.<BR><BR>The inner plate can be turned to time the points. This "plate" system is a lot easier to work on than the PM302, which has everything down inside of a box, nder the mechanical advance. <BR><BR>When I first began this project, I intended to make a solid state systen that was triggered by points, using a Ford TFI IV ignition module. I ran into some problems with it wanting to change the timing setting, and after fighting with it for a while tried it as a points only system. Later I discovered that the cam I was using (taken from a PM302) was the problem. It was ground incorrectly- instead of the lobes being 180 degrees apart, they were more like 177/183. I'd clip the strobe light to one sparkplug lead and set the timing to 5 degrees BTDC.... and the next time I'd check (using the other cylinder because it didn't make any difference, right?), and the timing would be at 1 degree after TDC. A lot of head-scratching was done before finally discovering the issue with the points cam. By that time I'd discovered the points only system worked so well, I never went back to the electronicly assisted version. Even if it did lower the current trough the points to less than 15 microamps.<BR><BR>The Ford TFI does have a lot of potential. It's a "digtal" (on-off) system as compared to GM, Toyota and most of the rest which use an analog input. It has one interesting feature- a "retard" function for starting. The firing signal is a square wave, much like the output of a set of points. Normally, the TFI fires when it detects the "rising", or leading side of the wave. If 12 volts is applied to one of the inputs (in this case from the starter motor), the TFI fires on the "descending" or trailing side of the wave. This retards the timing by the amount of time the input signal is present. I was going to try firing it using a blanking disc on the end of the camshaft with an infrared LED and phototransistor on either side of the disc. By adjusting the length of the windows cut in the disc to equal 35 degrees or so of crankshaft rotation, it could be switched from "idle" advance to"running"advance simply by applying or removing 12 volts to the terminal on the module. But the points system is working so well, I lost interest!<IMG class=bbc_emoticon alt= src="http://www.russianiron.com/forums/public/style_emoticons/default/party.gif"> <BR><BR>PeteT. <BR><BR><BR><BR>P.S.: edthetermite over on Soviet Steeds has been using this system for a while, and he's happy with it, as far asI know.<BR><BR>P.P.S.: Each cylinder has it's own points cam lobe, ie: one lobe always fires the right cylinder, and the other lobe always fires the left cylinder. This was what had me confused for a while. The two lobes were not 180 apart, so if you timed the engine using one cylinder (which has a dedicated lobe), the timing would then be off on the other cylinder (because it's lobe was not ground in the right place). It was enough to make a person want to take up golf!
  11. That's a beauty, all right! The heavier, the better. (until you have to move it!). I found a 1920's vintage Brown&Sharpe #3 surface grinder at a junk auction years ago. Bought it for $100- all three thousand pounds of it! Someone had been using it for a bench grinder , and there was about 1/8" of up and down slop in the spindle. The spindle ran on brass bushings, so I bored the bushings oversize and turned a new spindle out of 316 stainless. Did the final fitting by polishing it to size using an air die grinder with a Scotchbrite pad while spinning it on the lathe. Took a full week to turn the bushings, spindle, and fit everything. The running clearence was so tight you could feel air molecules being sheared in half as the spindle was inserted into the bushings! When it was done, it was accurate to +/- the thickness of a lead pencil line- you could crank it through it's full travel, return to the original setting, and errase the line without throwing a spark. Good enough for me! Had to move to the city, so I gave it to a friend of mine. He's using it to support a mailbox at the end of his driveway. PeteT.
  12. PeteT

    Old Tools?

    I throw mine in a box, and eventually use them when I have to make a special tool for work. When you need a 1/4 or 3/8 female square to be driven with a ratchet, it's a lot easier to weld on an old misfit socket than to tool up and broach the hole . PeteT.
  13. Greetings, 2%! If I remember correctly from the research I did a couple of years ago, the PM302A advance should hit full advance at between 1700 and 1800 crankshaft RPMs. Total travel of the mechanical advance is 17 degrees at the camshaft (34 degrees at the crankshaft). When I was re-designing the ignition system on my 2005 Ural, I ordered three PM302's via the internet. None could be made to work according to spec! The flyweights just didn't have enough mass to rotate the cam- even when spinning at 3000 RPMs (that's 6000 RPMs at the crankshaft!). I tried welding more weight to the ends of the flyweights... and even tried using just one spring. Still couldn't make it work. I finally gave up and made a points plate with two sets of points arranged 163 degrees apart. One set of points was used for starting and idle, the other was used for anything above idle. A toggle switch on the left handlebar where it can be easily reached by the thumb was used to select the advance mode required. I discovered several things- first, switiching to the "advanced" set of points as soon as the clutch is fully engaged while pulling away from a stop works just fine. No problems with pinging, and it actually improved the acceleration and low speed fuel economy by having the advance take place at a lower RPM. Secondly, when using engine braking, switching to the "Idle" points holds the rig back a little more effectively. The advanced setting also works quite well as a fast idle during warm up. When the oil is cold, it will raise the idle from 900 RPMs to about 1600-1800 RPMs, and the longer combustion duration also makes the warm up somewhat quicker. Once fully up to operating temperature, idle RPM with the timing advanced can be as high as 3000 RPMs- without moving the carb butterflys. At the moment, I've settled on 5 degrees before TDC for the idle timing, and 36 degrees BTDC for the running timing. I tried as high as 41 degrees with complete success, but I figured 36 degrees ran just as well and would probably be easier on the crankshaft and bearings. I used a Bosch air cooled VW condensor, along with VW points and a Harley coil. This combination worked better than I could ever have dreamed! I haven't touched the points since sorting it all out- it's been running fine for over three years now. Looks like a perfect match. The best part is that I now have complete control of the ignition timing. The Mk V ignition I had would change advance while running, causing the engine to lose power and act just like a fuel starvation problem. PeteT.
  14. The biggest factor is the type of bearings being used. Ball and roller bearings (and gears) tend to break up the oil molecules at a faster rate than "friction" type bearings... which results in loss of viscosity. In short- these engines are harder on oil... and there's less oil in the system (2 litres) to carry the load- hence the requirement for frequent oil changes. On the plus side- cheap dino oil will do the job just fine in this application, and two litres at a time shouldn't break the bank . The change schedule could be extended if there was more oil in the system to share the work (iE. deep sump)... but then it would take longer to come to operating temperature in cold weather. Decisions, decisions! PeteT.
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